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, follow me! >> hello, america. today is a very, very special day. it's president obama's birthday. he turns 48 today, which, by the way, is only 16 more years than we had czars. 16 more czars to go before his age equals total number of czars. here is the one thing tonight -- it has been an amazing life for our 44th president, and i, like the rest of america, am inspired by his story, so, i'd like to share it with you tonight. story of barack obama. it starts -- well, it starts with his parents, ann donovan, barack obama, sr. oh, sure. sure, it begins like any other classic american love story, when these two love birds met while taking a russian language class. how many of our parents met there taking russian in 1960 at the height of the cold war? i can't count the numbers that met that way. by 1961, they were married are, and later that very same year, barack obama, jr., was born. president obama so movingly called this story during a speech commemorating the anniversary of the civil rights march in selma. >> i am disturbed what happened across the country because of folks in selma,
. >> public money, and i'm sure. >> my taxes? >> america's cable companies greeted c-span as a public service, a private business initiative, no government mandate or money -- that was held c-span was created. >> congress has delayed action on health care until after the august recess. this morning, we talk about this on "washington journal." host: tell us about the progress that was made on monday and what the senate may or may not be doing. guest: the house energy and commerce committee was able to pass the house democrats' version of health reform bill. they have been having a bit of trouble all along the way with some of the more conservative democrats, but they were able to make some deals and the house should take it up when they return from recess. the senate finance committee is working on a bipartisan health care bill right now and they will be working on this all week. i do not expect to see a final bill from them this week. aba proposal or something like that, but nothing complete. they have sent us a deadline of the 15th. probably after the recess. host: what about the fact that t
do believe that conservatives will govern america in the future. in my lifetime i have been involved three times at the national level of helping conservatives capture the republican party. in 1964 with goldwater, haiti with reagan and in 1994 the gingrich evolution so i think that we can do it again but this time to a very different and not just the control of the republican party but take control of all of american politics and win the gop. and again as americans. it will not be led by washington d.c. insiders, the people who caused the problem cannot cure the problem. they cannot fix it and we have as conservatives been betrayed. i wrote a book a few years ago called conservatives betrayed. george w. bush and other republicans hijacked the conservative cause. of all of our problems, with the problems obviously with the unions and mainstream media and this and that but that is not the real problem. we 13 landslide presidential elections in the 1980's with the same opponents. the problem quite frankly is the government republicans, george bush, karl rove, tom delay, denny hastert, i
believe that elizabeth and i both agree that there needs to be comprehensive health care reform in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. and i hope that it's a bipartisan one that i think can be passed energy. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in a quazi insurance company of its own? >> we can pass health care reform without what is commonly referred to as a public option, which means to compete with your private insurers, with united health care or aetna or blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the option of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass any kind of reform without that public option. for a lot of reasons. one of the things we want to do is make certain we're providing to 46 million americans who are uninsured to 25 million who are underinsured, a way of getting reliable, transparent and cost effective, accessible -- cost accessible insurance. the way you do that is make certain y
, and remember, you question with boldness! come on, follow me. hello, america. we have some more questions for you tonight. i believe, just so you know going in that this is probably the most controversial show of the week, because you must understand the last three episodes of this show to be able to see and come to a place where you can believe that these crazy things may actually be happening. i want you to know, i hope these things are not happening. i hope that there is some other explanation, but i needed you to see who is advising the president earlier this week and what they are doing and who they are before i could ask you to look at this phrase from barack obama and think that the president of the united states literally means this. >> we cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives that we set. we've got to have a civilian national security force that's just as powerful, just as strong, just as well funded. glenn: i mean, i don't know how anybody is going to respond to the facts that i'm going to present tonight, because quite
is the day i break my diet. oh, this job. how do i work with these conditions? hello, america. i have decided, because i saw the president's town hall meeting -- oh, it was rivetting. i think i have to change my thinking around this healthcare bill, because now, all of a sudden, reputable doctors are showing up to town halls, like totally reputable doctors, like totally showing their support for obama-care. >> your name? >> we're position is that we are like so for treating preventable conditions. how will it help me as a p.d.p.? >> first of all, give her a hand, because she is a primary care physician. [applause] how long have you been practicing? >> four years. >> give her another hand! glenn: i got to tell you, that was like so awesome, she was just like, there, i mean, she was like, i'm a doctor and i have doctor-like questions. that was great, and then, finally, a town haller, without that pesky cell phone interrupting sheila. it was great. i loved how sheila was spontaneous, you know, give sheila a little loving. it was great. it was unscripted. it was almost a pure moment. sheila jacks
. these are frightening people and you have to answer one question tonight, and, is america waking up? i think they are. they are giving congressmen an earful during their listening tours. some of them don't seem to be listening. oh, they will. i promise you video that you just want to see. you're not going to want to miss this. if you believe this country is great, and you don't think a disclaimer should steal your right to property and privacy, stand up and come follow me! well, hello, america. well, that is one ugly guy. holy cow, that's me! hello and welcome to the program. apparently last friday, i committed the ultimate sin in the liberal blogging world. mom, i'm working on a blog right now! yeah, apparently i questioned a government program. how could you possibly do that? cash for clunkers has orwellian wording that is creepy and anybody that isn't creeped out isn't paying attention. that's just the problem here. i brought that up. the liberal blogs went nuts. oh, that crazy conspiracy theorist glenn beck. really, it is a conspiracy? i mean, it was riert there. hello! yeah, in that faux news, y
, in solidarity with his hometown. >> i believe it would have an enormous impact upon america. in other words, you are telling the taxpayer that everybody is suffering and you're suffering. >> reporter: chicago's not the only american city that's forcing furlough days upon its workers. in fact, some local and state governments are incorporating them on a regular basis, desperate to cut budgets anywhere they can. michigan wants to save nearly $22 million through six unpaid days. in colorado, furlough days may be accompanied by pay cuts as well. but nothing compares to california, where more than 90% of state workers will be off on the first and third friday of each month until june of 2010. >> it's a much better alternative than people being laid off. >> reporter: despite the sacrifices by city workers, chicago will still be $300 million short of what it needs to fund next year's budget. diana alvear, abc news, chicago. >>> today, an american man who was in prison in one of the most reclusive and repressive countries on earth was set free after a visiting u.s. senator won his release. this man's fr
confronting their public servants. is that new in america? >> that report showed you and your viewers the sights and sounds of democracy in action. i think that should be applauded and we should say thank you to the people who are standing up to a very bad idea. we have in this tradition an ability for people to fight against ideas they don't like. we want them to do it peacefully and civilly but this should be respected, not criticized. if anybody is undermining the direction of the country it's people like dr. dean who say we should have a new health care system proposed by president obama. sean: interesting to see if the media will call him out on what he just lied about because we saw the tape and heard him with our own ears. 58 democratic senators. obviously byrd and kennedy are not feeling well so i wouldn't expect them to have a town hall but less than a third are willing to go out and meet with the american people. grandmothers, stay at home moms, veterans, concerned citizens. do you think they're hiding from the american people or they're afraid? >> clearly there's been a sca
clunker, stand up! come on, follow me. by the way, hello, america. it's friday. i want to show you here. this is at houdini water torture cell. our miracle worker, barack obama, is upside-down now, blindfolded and chained in. houdini could escapes. we'll monitor his progress to see how the magician of magicians gets out of this trouble. cash for clunkers program is what he's being suspended in right now, but he will get out of it. it's proving that all the big government haters are wrong, because it's so popular in just a few days, nearly all of the money for the program has already been used up. here is the one thing -- congratulations, washington. you figured out that people like free stuff! but that doesn't mean cash for clunkers is a success. sure, all the politicians are giddy. representative ed markey, the author of cash for clunkers, says it has become one of the most success successful stimulus programs of 2009. whoa. that's saying an awful lot of press secretary robert gibbs said "you keep on buying cars all weekend long!" but what really has happened with the cash for clunkers
from the staff of huckabee, good night. see you next week, everybody. god bless. >>> hello, america. welcome to the glen beck program. tonight we are going to focus on one of these things all] week. webama, the left, internationalists, graph, acorn. revolutionaries. tonight, hidden agendas and tomorrow the army that willtonh enforce it. tonight, if you care anythingce about free speech you are goin, to see it crushed in front oft your eyes.fron rushh limb brau will be joining me in -- limbaugh will be a f joining me in just a few e minutes. if things don't make sense, wee will make sense of it beginning begi again tonight.. come come on, follow me. >>> hello, america. o, we are halfway through the weeh and here are the things that ww learned so far if you are joining us for the first timeog tonight. all, first of all, congress is beyond not reading the bills. they are not even writing the a bills. they are being written by a vast network that is out in the wide open yet the media refuses to report on them. organizations filled with socialists, communists, revolutionaries and pull th
of distinguished guests broke i have an newsmax one of the new on-line new media companies in america restarted 10 years ago and we reach 5 million americans most people know was best from newsmax.com but also publishes newsmax magazine and also many news.com online and reared dedicated the american public needs to hear both sides of the story we're seeing the obama presidency that the media is giving the public a one-sided view on important public policy issues. joining us today are a number of people involved with not only republican politics, a conservative politics but the media as well we have a number of powerhouse to describe the people on the panel today. some of them are not household names but names that carry significant weight in the conservative movement the far left is richard viguerie considered the godfather of conservative direct mail and has created the modern conservative movement by helping dozens and dozens of leading conservative groups in the nation bypass the media and recharge to get donors to support causes that advocate for conservative principles brought next to him is
was with my father on this tr. for us, it was like christopher columbus' discovery of america and we discovered america for ourself. we knew manhaan a america is very different. we knew something from mark twain of the 19th century america. it was a new world and we tried to find out what it looks like. very interesting. that it is just the detail of this book. but from the oer side, my first question is why did you write this book? 50 years ago, a visit from one little country to the united states may be other leaders came here. sometimes they were eccentric. president yeltsin was more eccentric. wind khrushchev came here, he just showed the time li a contemporary politician would rather go to but larry chiao other than thenn bause part of this was my father's behavior. maybe because it was not eliminated at the time. nodid one visage but it was change. wire rope the but? >> guest: i wrote the book because i happened to stumble upon the story of your father, micki chris jeff, a trip to the united stes which is now 50 years ago but when i stumbledpon it, it was 30 or 35 years old. i
neighbor and mr. obama fri has to go to the fifth summit of the americas and in trinidad and he has already been told by the mexican the and especially the brazilian president, lula da silva, he was going to run into some really heavy criticism in trinidad if something can't be done for the embargo. so they're still a long way to go. it could go fast, it could go slow and in his miami speech last may candidate obama suggested it was going to go slow. he promised to keep the rest of the embargo he said because united states needed to be a relentless advocate of democracy, and of quote. but slowly or quickly is very clear that our current dysfunctional policy is coming to the end of its life. what do i mean by dysfunctional? i mean that the united states and cuba have not had formal relations since january feared, 1961. that was e leffinge presidents ago -- 11 presidents ago. in contrast the u.s. estrangement from this movie gets revolution after the bolshevik revolution and is a strain from the people's republic of china after the fall of chang that lasted 16, 22 years respectively. the five
americans are figuring out that it is bad for america and bad for them, so i think we are seeing the pendulum swing back. he is changing the political climate back to republican. greta: so what is the strategy for the republican party as these town halls continue to unfold across the country during this recess? >> this is a groundswell of grass roots people who are ticked off, and that is why we have a democracy. it is not so much of a grand strategy as a and a weakening or a reawakening of the country. xd-- not as much of a grand strategy as a weakening or a we awakening -- or a reawakening of the country. free enterprise, personal responsibility, liberty, and the like, and he is headed in a different direction. greta: they have said this is a little bit like herding cats. as a practical matter, the president and speaker pelosi and the senate majority leader, and they do not even need republican votes to get this passed, so why do they not just go ahead, get there and democrats, and forget about republicans and pass it? then what? >> well, they have the votes to do that, but i t
everything because they have no cars. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. it is saturday, august 29th. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. we're here at the jfk presidential library in boston. senator ted kennedy lies in repose behind me in this building. we're told family members at this hour are getting ready at their hotel to come here. a senate delegation will come here, as well. they will all pay their last respects. and we'll have coverage of the senator's journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about his legacy. and some of his former staffers, like supreme court justice stephen breyer, who said working for ted kennedy was like a family. we know you have more, bill? >> we do. >>> we have more on that shocking story. jaycee lee dugard, held for 18 years. we're learning details of her ordeal, including reports that the neighbors voiced some concerns three years ago. but investigators never made it past the front porch. >>> and also, another story out of california. everything must go. that is, if it's government pro
the campaign is there is no red america, no blue america, no republican, no democrat. there is one america. tonight if what we are hearing is correct, if he says we are going to cling to the public plan no matter what, he is saying blue america wins. i'm the president of that america. this government-run plan doesn't have the support in the middle. that's why he is losing democrat support in the senate and thinking of trying to jam this through quickly with 50 votes. >> roy, do you think this is something they would go ahead with or maybe trying to float this idea to put pressure on everyone to come to some sort of agreement? >> i think that has to be part of it. just today gibbs said they hadn't decided in they were going to stop negotiating with the republicans. kyl said he wasn't going to whip up votes and grassley saying he might not support the thing he was negotiating for. all the signals were there and they weren't sure. when would they be sure? when the support of the american people drop to 29%? this is something they are putting out there as a threat they could pull back. it is a
managed state in america? did you know that under democratic leadership, seven times, we have been named the best they to do business in america ended june known that we have even been named by education week as the state were a child is most likely to have a successful life? [applause] that is what democratic leadership means. we find solutions to everyday issues that everyday people care about. the want to keep that going? [applause] i want to keep it going because i may not be governor in january but i will still be a virginian. what i know now is that we are in some tough times. this has been the most challenging economy that virginia or the nation has faced since the 1930's. i have had to make some painful decisions as governor but i made the decisions i needed to make to keep virginia moving in the right direction. when you're a governor in tough times, you come to appreciate character of people who can make tough decisions and do the right things to put virginia first and i am here to tell you that i will not lose one second of sleep and in fact i will sleep with a big smile on my
for growth and prosperity in the long run. these are the jobs futuring of america, renovating schools and hospitals. the elkhart area has seen the benefits. dozens were employed to resurface the runway at elkhart airport. a four mile stretch of highway is being upgrade order u.s. 33. the health center has received recovery dollars to expand services and hire additional staff. and as part of the recovery plan, we're making an historic amendment to innovation. building a new smart grid that carries electricity from coast to coast, laying down broad band lines and high speed rail lines, and providing the largest boost in basic research in history to ensure that american leads in the break through discoveries of the new century. just as we led in the last. because that's what we do best in america. we turn ideas ainto inventions. history should be our guide. the united states led the world economies in the 20th century because we led the world in innovation. today the competition is keen, the challenge is tougher and that's why innovation is more important than ever. that's the key to goo
in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. i hope that it is a bipartisan one that i think can be passed and energetically and have a great deal of support in the country. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in kind of a quasi insurance company of its own? >> can we get -- pass health care reform? we can pass health care reform without having -- what is commonly referred to as a public option. which means that to compete with your private insurers, united health care, cigna, blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the opening of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass anything -- any kind of reform without -- without that public option for a lot of reasons. one is that one of the things we want to do is make certain that we are striving to 46 million americans uninsured 25 million underinsured, a way of getting reliable transparent and cost-effective accessible -- cost accessible insurance and the w
it is being done. and it is immoral for a -- for the united states of america to have tens of billions of people without health insurance and adequate health care. that's a bad thing. that is not american. >> the three big buzz words are cost, quality and coverage. we know some trillion dollar plan will probably cover more people. will it decrease costs? the c.b.o. says no. people say, why would we do that? that's not clear. in fact that have private insurance already, have said in the "wall street journal" poll, they think it is going to get worse, there's a public auction out there and maybe they're a private company will water down their insurance man and i might say, my company is not great, so maybe i'll go on the public plan. that's how everybody is thinking. that's why this has gotten away from the president. he's got to do a better job about selling why it is worth this. >> he's got a complicated argument. the republicans came in with a simple bumper sticker. government takeover of health care and everybody hates it. and he adds, things get worse if we don't do anything, how do
hundreds. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrificed to bring about? >>> how to measure success in america's other war in afghanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were de
, in particular the adoption of broadband in america to help make the united states the most connected nation on earth. we have to hold loafer reduce the holdovers from the last commission. the interim chairman of the fcc showed what an outstanding public servant he is and what an outstanding leader he was. then we have to back new commissioners, both of whom are known to the industry. meredith baker, from her service in the ntma. this is a very eminent fcc. from their comments and their testimony, there are very focused on moving the telecommunications industry forward and on pursuing policies that will be really impact fulful. >> we have some new leadership in the commerce committees that oversee fcc. how do you think they are going to get along with him as things go forward? senator rockefeller on numerous occasions has said that the fcc needs reform. he is laser focused on it. >> i think not only senator rockefeller, but a lot of people who have focused on that. i think reform of the fcc can come in multiple ways. it can come from congress or from the commission itself. both the acting ch
the celebration by singing god bless america and i hope you'll join them. . . the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. he had his sleeves and wakeful nights. he had his nightmares and yet he dreamt a dream that was trapped of the heart -- that was a draft of the heart and only his great heart could hold. he gave flesh to that the dream in the noble house of his thought where the sick were healed, the sphere broken, and the stranger welcomed. it is the age-old dream of the profits -- of the profitphets. there will be a bank would ge-- there will be a bank with yet -- there will be a banquet yet. the laugh, the sound of roses, the music -- may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ♪ ♪ dodd bless america -- god bless america ♪ landed that i love the ♪ stand beside her ♪ and the guide her ♪ through the night ♪ with the light from above ♪ from the mountain to the prairie ♪ to the ocean ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ died bless america -- god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand beside her ♪ and a
with the seawall with his finger. the fable has it parallel in debate on modern values. this time it is america that is trying to put its finger in the dike. to hold back the tide the tide of liberal values spilling over from europe espially from that same small country abutting the north sea with his 16 million dutch citizens. practitioners of a secular values called quote-unquote personal autonomy. the netherlands was the first country to legalize the right to die known as u euthanasia. and dutch has same sex marriage soft drugs, prostitution, and coffee shops that serve hashish. question, are americans destined to take our values cues from the dutch. well jew deyo christian be pushed aside for personal autonomy. is the jesus of bethlehem destined to be side lined by the doctrine and practice of personal autonomy. are we all going dutch? >> we'll ask these experts. paul sar bin, and steven plo ploerow. rabin, and steven ploerow. ploerow. >> plott row. announcer: if. for such a small word, it packs a wallop. if i live to 100. if social security isn't enough. if my heart gets broken. if she say
charged with trading them. 150 years since the start of america's oil rush. we're now in the place where it began. >> then natural gas that is being developed in this country at this point and time may get us to energy independence. >> years after britain declared war on hitler's germany, a new exhibition reveals what went on in winston churchill's secret underground bunker. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 1:00 p.m. in berlin. the israeli prime minister is meeting german chancellor merkel. the country's share a unique history. the trip includes various reminders of the holocaust. two issues are likely to dominate today's talks. the question of the settlements in the west bank, which germany opposes, and what to do about iran, which netanyahu describes as a threat to israel. >> this is the last leg of benjamin netanyahu's four-day tour. it follows talks in london, during which time hopes were raised that there could be agreements on settlements in the west bank. israel is said to be ready to restrict construction. it may not be the comprehensive freeze that the ame
to an end. the extraordinary good that he did lives on. to his family he was a guardian. to america, the defender of a dream. >> after the assassinations, he became the family patriarchç ad eventual become an american political icon. for nearly five decades in the senate, kennedy was the leading voice of his party's liberal wing. at the 1980 convention speech, it was a kennedy classic. >> for all of those whose cares have been our concern, the work goes on, the hobe still lives and the dream shall never die. -- the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. ♪ >> love him or hate him, and there are still some ted kennedy haters out there, it is safe to say that washington will not be the same without him. he died this week at the age of 77 at his home in massachusetts. he was diagnosed with a brain tumor in may of 2008. we knew and he knew that there was no cure, only delaying action. >> there will be again a new generation of americans and i hope rises again and the dream lives on. >> despite his condition, the kennedy made an appearance at barack obama's convention in denv
on the czars an statements that should horrify america and connections to some other people and to the white house and what it means for your healthcare in the future, particularly if you are elderly, handicapped or have a very young child. if you believe this country is great but that government healthcare is taking us in directions we promised ourselves we would never go down again, stand up. come, follow me. hello, america. tonight i ask you to stay with the program. this is not a sound byte program tonight, although it will be taken out of context and it will be used and it will be called fear mongering. what i call this is question with boldness. questions that need answers. we must have answers. i am only following the directions of the president of the united states. he told us how to find out what he really believes and that's exactly what we're going to do. in a couple of minutes, we're going to talk about healthcare, the views of obama's czars and his close advisors and why it's important to look there. it's important to know where they stand, but first, i want to start someplace t
is trying to change america but maybe not the change you bar gained for. jon voight will be here to tell us why he has become so involved and he will give us his take on healthcare reform. >>> and they are one of the top christian music bands in the world. but recording platinum albums and selling out concerts not their only job. they are also youth counselors who try to keep youth on the right path. they perform one of their biggest hits here on the show tonight. >>> well, this weekend, funeral services were held for senator ted kennedy and with his burial the end of a long and storied senate career. though there were many controversies over the issues in his personal life, he was true to his personal political convictions. he didn't try to reinvent himself with each election or poll and proudly proclaimed himself a liberal when most ran from the label. i respect people honest their own political leanings far from those that change with the season. no one can accuse ted ken day of campaigning differently than he served or he believed. you can work with a principled liberal more effectively
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
apw were black because of blood. >> oliver: the only war america lpu could we have won? >> easily, easily. >> oliver: was itúqpw>=med fromy the start? >> you wanted an advisor who would tell him what he wanted to hear. in beirut, thanks.pw next news break, bottom of the t'r?ries with oliver north"q ÷y american infantryman can't be pushed, they have to be led from tzu front. this statue called follow me úwú/es tzu spirit of the the perilous business of war on the ground. on the gr north, this is war stories. coming to you from fort coming t georgia, home of the u.s. army infantry since 1918. during the 1960's and 70's, hundreds of thousands of young@@ soldiers honed their combat skills here. but american involvement in southeast asia began years before our first air and ground combat units arrived in 1965. early in the cold war against communists, the eisenhower administration spent billions fight against ho chi minh. supported himho chi minh. when he was our ally against the japanlá Ñ in world war ii. how did the united states find itself embroiled in vietnam fighting war th
on board, because america's doctors and nurses know how badly we need reform. [applause] we have broad agreement in congress on about 80% of what we are trying to achieve. we have agreement from drug companies to make prescription drugs more affordable for seniors. $80 billion that can cut the doughnut hole that seniors have to deal with on prescription drug plans in half. [applause] the aarp supports this policy and agrees with us that reform must happen this year. because we are getting close, the fight is getting fierce. history is clear. every time wherein side of reform, special interest are fighting back with everything they have got -- every time we are in sight of reform. let's face it, they get people scared, and understandably. i understand why people are nervous. health care is a big deal. in fact, whenever america has set about solving our toughest problems, there have always been those who sought to preserve the status quo by scaring the american people. that is what happened when fdr tried to pass social security. they said that was socialism. verbatim, that is what they
. >>> good morning, america. it is august 29th. saturday morning. and a who's who of american politics is descending on boston. th's where kate snow is this morning. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. senator ted kennedy lies in pose. a senate delegation will arrive shortly to the library where we are to pay their last respects. we'll have journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about carrying on his legacy. and we'll talk to some of his former staffers, including supreme court justice steven breyer. and he'll talk about how he inspired them to greatness. i know you have more to come in new york, bill. >> we do, kate. >>> we have the latest on that shocking story out of california. jaycee dugard, kidnapped in california. held for 18 years. we're learning new details, including just how close the authorities came to finding jaycee, when neighbors had their suspicions. >>> and a different story in northern california. everything must go, if it's government property, that is. the state is in such dire financial straits, they're having a fire sale. comp
that while america has turned over security to the iraqis, iraq is not secure. >>> facts of life. new insight into america's health. we are living longer, and the death rates for major diseases are falling. >>> dirty dealers. extraordinary undercover video reveals just how easy it is to buy a gun illegally. >>> and, sour notes. the proud members of the truly terrible orchestra, and the the proud members of the truly terrible orchestra, and the music they make. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good evening. we begin tonight with two stories literally about life and death. we have new insight into the state of america's health. we are living longer than ever. there are advances against major diseases. minorities enjoy better health, and we'll get to that in a moment. but we also got a reminder that sudden death at the hands of terrorists is still a reality in iraq. a wave of explosions throughout baghdad killed nearly 100 people and injured hundreds more today. and the 130,000 u.s. troops in that country could do little to help. under the terms of the security agreement, demanded by the iraqi
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
that stuff too. the all new chevy traverse. america's best crossover. mike: in the "personal story," segment, the president is comparing himself to fdr and jfk. >> fdr was called a socialist when he passed social security, jfk and lyndon johnson, they were both accused of a government takeover of health care when they passed medicare. this is the process that we go through because understandably, the american people are suspicious of government until the government does something that helps them and then they don't want anyone messing with that. mike: joining us is douglas brinkley, a presidential historian. doctor, thank you for joining us. let me ask you, a big mistake on the part of the president to invoke the memories of fdr and jfk? >> well, it is never a mistake for a democratic president to raise respect for fdr and jfk. the lyndon johnson comments gets into the difficulty. as you know, the great society is what ronald reagan fought against. he is trying to roll back the great society, that is what he wrote in his memos. many other government programs, conservatives have been trying t
. >> the government has plunged america from the number one nation to be number one in debt it nation on the planet. >> keep the government out of it. we are doing just fine. >> this is a vehicle. it is taking us down a path of total socialism. >> a new regime in washington would dismiss a nationwide grassroots uprising. >> [inaudible] >> if you want to be let out of here, you are welcome to go. >> i say to all of them, put your ear to the ground. a terrifying rumble is shaking this nation. listen to us, or your days are numbered. >> i want to speak my mind before i leave. >> i do not like being lied to and i do not like being lied about. >> i understand why people are angry. i am angry, too. >> across the nation, a giant is awakening that has never been defeated. that name is "we, the people." we are sleeping no more. >> we are tired of this. that is why everyone in this room is so ticked off. >> this happened in 1776 and it is happening again. americans are shouting in one voice. enough is enough. return the public to its rightful owners, the citizens of the united states of america. on this nigh
, the angry in america. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- shepard: u.s. marines now on the move. they are looking to free a town from taliban forces. >> we are on the offensive. shepard: tonight, the video you will see only on fox. >> pushing back at to the health care town halls and why the aarp says they are not on board yet. the issues are so important, they are about the health of our parents, children, ourselves. across america, lawmakers have been holding town hall meetings to talk about to the health-care plan. they are trying to create a health care system for uninsured americans. a lot of people are fired up on this. we put people on location in colorado, california, maryland, iowa, new jersey. we have noticed something in common at many of these meetings, it seems that with passions and tempers running so high that issues are drowned out by debate. just because people are yelling, it does not mean that they are getting their message across any more clear. >> i am here today because i believe in town hal
of america, that is now insolvent. the pride of the world, in fact. it's not basically insolvent. except was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. you're reaching your five minutes. >> retail sales, even recently, kept going down. so we're in some trouble here. what will you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. that it wasn't capitalism. it wasn't unguided capitalism. it was government that did it. it was government that told those brilliant investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities they did not understand. it was government who told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it was government that told people, and all these new mortgage brokers, sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand them, even when you can't understand them. because you'll make a lot of money on it. and i can go on and on, as you all know. >> no, you can't go on and on. you're using up your five minutes. >> you
is an extraordinary icahn for latin america. he came to providence in 1960's which is when that america literature first came to international prominence and it became possibly the most popular and and most no literature in the world. it appeared in 1966 and not appear until the mid-1960s and not doing terribly well did not become later what it was to become an 1967 which was gabriel garcia marquez. his 100 years of solitude it was almost as if it was predestined it would finally cap latin-american and not all it was famous before he published it the most famous at this point* was ulysses his novel became famous oliver north america perhaps after he hadn't written the first that was it. it would be a best seller and a great latin-american novel. he just knew it. him and his friends started to write articles when even marquez was only halfway through it. it did not happen very often but it did then. most latin american novels published 500 or 1,000 would be a very good printer run in the 1960's but all of a sudden one-man publishes 8,000 was the first run and repeated a couple of weeks later and re
. i emphasize that they may not be representative of america. their views have to be taken into account. >> there is some disagreement. >> how are we supposed trust you? is there an option to say no to this bill? >> it is not about health care reform or insurance reform. it is about government control. >> i charge you with usurping authority not granted to you as a u.s. senator. >greta: houston, texas a councilwoman answers a cell phone while a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> if you're conscious allows you, what are you doing for america -- >> seriously, really. come on. [unintelligible] >> do you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy asked that question and joins us live. was there any explanation by the congresswoman by what happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about her using the phone. what appeared to be happening was her staff was telling her that there were local political leaders coming to the meeting that he -- that she should talk to. greta: did she pick up the phone in the middle of your question? do you know who she was
. and this became an occasion for me to explain in america there is a company where you can actually borrow a car and give it back in what was interesting about that too one liberian member of the fugees was that he now lives in a culture amazingly enough where a total stranger would not only lead to a carbon trusted you to bring it back, that was a real shocker. i would try to explain that you give them this piece of plastic with some numbers on and if you take off with a car or crashes there will read a letter to this company called experian and then you can buy a house and tried to explain in you realize this is absurd. no wonder is so hard for refugees to figure out our culture. look at how many layers we have piled on to something as simple as borrowing a car and ellis of consequences can be very long if you screw up. in the there were other moments that were more serious and more poignant by thing for me one of the most poignant moments of my reporting was talking to a sudanese refugee about his experience coming to the u.s. charismatic incredibly talented soccer player at an academic schol
. more than that it was a road trip across america and the 1950's it elimited what i became hooked on that i rd the clips and is the rocks a bunch of them and filed them away for futureeference. then i began to read your father's nemours and he wrote to a lot about it and his memoirs were very human, very funny he was wonderfully earth the and started to read other pele's nemours and i became the world's only khrushchev buff. i was writing for the "washington post" a few years ago and realize the 50th anniversary was coming and if i was er going to write the book, ihould do it now so i did and it is now and it is called "k blows top". the reason for the title is it is the third line of 33 line have died from the nework daily news it was denied to tour of disneyland, it "k blows top". he was not allowed to go there but we can get into that later. >> host: your book is very different because it is filled with political analysisdiscussion in trying toush this of the historic cold war and it was part of the khrushchev are in toronto and -- on to rise entourage. i was scared. [laughter]
with america with over 300 million americans you have to pick a handful of big ideas, talk about them and leslie and gradually over time you'll build an effect in a residence and the country it will learn and have a genuine dialogue. >> host: san diego, you are on thair, i like to talk about how the american enterprise institute that mr. gingrich is associated with is highlighted in the book frequently. i would like to address some key aspects that have not been brought up. a first of all, mr. gingrich i it was at a presentation and was unable to ask a questiobecause of the democratic moderator there wouldn't call in may because i had a challenge richard perle the day before about agenda associated with that you. the project with a new american century which has been disbanded only in name only and you are a propagandist of these people. you can't look yourself up in that wall is a book about the power of low lobby called the israel lobby and u.s. foreign policy. there is a media blackout in america. 60 minutes and c is refusing to do a segment on it yet these the esteemed political s
of which i think we must respect. >> beth mendelsohn with voice of america, the afghanistan service. if one of the candidates doesn't get 50% and this goes into a second round and things get complicated there, what are the constitutional laws that are in place? can karzai call the loya jirga? and also if it goes the way some of the things did in iran, what is the united states prepared to do in these circumstances? >> rinna? >> i'd like barney to comment on this as well. if there is a security situation then there are stipulations where a loya jirga can be called. but i'd like barney to speak in more detail about this as well. >> well, i'm not sure what your question is about. according to the constitution if no one gets more than 50% of the vote, then a second round has to be held within two weeks of the date of announce mentd of the result. perhaps your question is what is -- if there is civil conflict and it is not possible to do that. we of course do not want to address hypothetical questionsb3 like that. there is an international presence in afghan government that is our partner and if
are the russians parking their subs off the eastern seaboard of america. also, cnbc regular, top name on banking why the "g-men" ought to keep their mud hook off bank of america's ken lewis, we're back before you can say government gone wild! >>> all aboard the recovery train. dennis kneale is driving the recession out and driving profits back in. >> i am selling the hope, baby, i truly believe this recession is over. >> you want a little optimism to end your day? yeah. >> there's reason for hope. >> he's the real deal. he's dennis kneale. watch "cnbc reports" week nights at 8:00 eastern. >> it could be the most important indicator, jobs report. it seems like the world will never be the same. but there is a light beginning to shine again. the spark began where it always begins. at a restaurant downtown. in a shop on main street. a factory around the corner. entrepreneurs like these are the most powerful force in the economy. they drive change and they'll relentless push their businesses to innovate and connect. as we look to the future, they'll be there ahead of us, lights on, showing us the way
evening, everyone. i'm don lemon. >>> we begin with america's ferocious debate over health care reform growing more unhealthy by the day. across the country we're witnessing town hall meetings on health care devolving into shouting matches worthy of a jerry springer episode with people lashing out over who ultimately pays the bill for millions of medically uninsured americans. >> the event remained largely civil. huge crowds overwhelmed the meeting hall with hundreds more gathering outside. >> we're very, very scared. >> when the republicans controlled congress and the senate, why didn't you introduce and pass health care reform? >> my biggest fear is this is going to get rammed down our throats. >> this is a mob. do we look like a mob? >> this doesn't look like mob this looks like home. >> some estimated that as many as another 800 couldn't get in and were locked outside. >> won't even let us in. they blocked us out. >> my son has the right to live. >> no doubt about it. >> my son has the right to health care. >> you don't really think you're going to get that, ma'am, in this bill, do
couldn't even vote for a senator if you were an ordinary citizen. so, the struggle foremocracy in america is ongoing. i think theresa is onto something very important. i'm not sure ralph nader is necessarily the best witness for the prosecution, precisely because he did such a brilliant and important job of holding regulatory agencies to account. when he was the g who was a national figure, fighting for those issues. and now that he is -- made himself a presidential candidate he has become unfortunately very in effect tulle in the most important work he has done. t, the -- absolutely, absolutely we need more democracy in america and won't get it until there is serious popular will for that. >> if youook closely at the 1968 election, george wallace got 13.5% of the vote, it was i a good thing for democracy. >> this is an excellent question and when i look ba, third parties in america, most frequently in our century, have been basically formed by southerners, hoping to hold the balance of power in the electoral college co they could basically broker who the president wouldet to be and were
: this is the national desk. they cover america. this is the foreign desk, covering the globe. every picture that comes into fox news channel comes through the media desk. here on "the live desk" those pictures will always be on the right-hand side of the screen. juliet: in the top box we are waiting for president obama to begin speaking in phoenix, talking about the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and as we wait, the health care debate rages on. the president last week said that a public option is an absolute must in any health care bill, but now the white house could be changing its tune. and an update on a story that we broke. e-mails from the white house going to people who never asked for them. now the white house is responding. in the middle box, a tragedy in the sky. fighter jets colliding as they rehearse for an air show. in the bottom box, hurricane season is in full swing. the florida panhandle is dealing with the aftermath of the claudette and now hurricane bill is picking up strength. trace: we begin with health care and the question over president obama's plan for health insurance is dead or
're praying for you. hello, america. i've been watching the media watch the media watch the town hall protests. do you remember the initial reaction? i believe it was astroturf. these are fake grassroots. these people aren't even real. senator barbara boxer. i like to call her babbs, says the last time she saw such nicely-dressed fake protests protests -- i don't even know what that means -- was in 2000 in florida with al gore, which, by the way i lived in florida. maybe i was responsible for that, too. that wasn't fake anger that. was real anger. fast forward to today, the fake grassroots is obviously not fake, so now that the poll numbers are going in the wrong direction and more people are getting sympathy for the people who attend these town hall meetings, the media has bailed on that fake strategy, and now have changed their opinion from this is fake anger to, man, these people are so angry they're dangerous. they don't have a gun. oh, if people have guns, we should remove all the guns. here is the one thing tonight. the radicals of the left, many of whom now work or meet at the white hou
sotomayor was sworn in this morning as america's 111th supreme court justice. chief justice john roberts administered the judicial oath during a public ceremony in the high court's conference room. it was the first time the court allowed tv coverage of a swearing-in ceremony. in spanish harlem, there was an enthusiastic viewing party. sotomayor is the first hispanic supreme court justice in u.s. history, and she's only the third woman to serve on the nation's high court, which is set to hear arguments in september, on september 9th in a campaign finance case. and coming in october, cnn will present "latino in america," a look at how hispanics are reshaping politics, business, schools and culture. in october only on cnn. >>> and there's been an alarming spike in iranian executions. the cause is unclear but it seems to have coincided with the re-election of disputed president ahmadinejad. president mahmoud ahmadinejad. amnesty international said there have been no less than 115 executions in iran in the past 50 days. now, it says, 24 of them occurred in one single day. we haven't been able
senate debate on c-span two. and coming in october on c-span, tour the homes of america's highest court, the supreme court. >> connecticut senatorer christopher dodd announced he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. this event took place in hartford, connecticut. it's about 10 minutes. >> i'm going to be fine. it's very, very manageable. the good news is i'm going to be back out and doing all the things to do in order to represent my states. thirdly i want to mention something i've talked a lot about over the last several weeks, but not in the context of the news today. as a member of congress, i have a very good health care plan. my health care plan allows me to get paid an annual physical. and because i have an annual physical, i was able to detect this cancer very early. i also then was able to take some time, because it is slow going, over the last six weeks, to talk to people about what's the best course of action to follow. i've developed a knowledge about prostate cancer as a result of reading books and talking to people. the best course of action was recommended to me, and t
? or is it getting stuck in the bureaucratic mud? >>> one country's trash is another country's poison. america's discarded electronics are endangering the lives of these kids half a world away. and ron claiborne travels to africa on the trail of e-waste. >>> and money rehab. one woman, 300 pairs of jeans, 160 pairs of shoes. and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders go to turn their lives around. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning, i'm just sending a tweet out. >> are you tweeting? >> right now! it is sunday, august 2nd. twitter's everywhere. it's everywhere. >> i thought we banned it from the set? >> no, i just sent your picture out. check it out, folks. 140 characters can it really get you into trouble? a lot of times we don't even think before we tweet but you really should because what you tweet could land you in court. one woman who slammed her landlord on twitter found out the hard way and she's being sued for defamation. we're going to get into this whole legal issu
wanted some legitimacy for their country. america has always said they would only talk to them in six- partyç talks, including our allies. kim jong-il got what he wanted, a former american president. as much as the white house and secretary of state say that there was no quid quo pro, and that president clinton was there on a private mission, -- it may have been a humanitarian issue, but even u.s. officials are telling us that he was given a briefing by cia and others before his visit. he was briefed on the latest with what they were doing, and there is no doubt duringç that three and a half hours with kim jong il, the issue must have come up. jon: is it possible that they held these meetings and did not discuss these issues? >> look at who met bill clinton. the deputy foreign minister who has been in charge of nuclear negotiations. he was very prominent. also, the north koreans, they broktwittered about this visit. they did not give much detail, just saying that president clinton came. the administration is trying their best to decoupled this visit from the nuclear issue. when yo
of america. and during the conversation comparing the canadian and the u.s. system and part of the interview includes a look at the cultural differences between our two countries. here's an excerpt of next week's q and a. >> i'm pretty tough on canada because they keep you waiting so long. and i was talking to minister in canada and i said you keep people waiting. how can you call this good health care? you have to wait months to see a speshtist. and his answer was, look, canadians don't mind waiting so much as long as the rich canadian and the poor canadian have to wait about the same amount of time. and that is their national culture. and we don't have that ethic. it's a standard in america that rich people are going to get better health care than poor people. no other country lets that happen. host: your response to the comments of the author. guest: well, i think i have to agree that this is a different attitude that we have and that you don't have here in the states. for us, it doesn't matter if you have money or you don't have money for health care, you will be offered the same kind of
the news begins. behind me is the national desk. they are covering america. over here is the foreign desk. they are covering the globe. every picture that comes into fox news channel comes in through here, our media desk. on "the live desk" those pictures will always be on the right-hand side of the screen. in the top box, breaking news concerning the deficit. the cbo has come out with a brand new numbers, and they are much worse than projected. polls show that americans believe the number one board of the obama administration should be to reduce the deficit. what does this mean for health care then, cap and trade, and other administration policies? in the middle box, a story that broke here on "the live desk." an explosion at a northern california high school. now we know about the man behind the bombing and the vast amount of weapons and explosives he was carrying. in the bottom box, developments on this model who was caught drinking beer and then must sentenced to be caned. now there is a key decision from the judge in the case. martha: also this afternoon dick cheney slamming the atto
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
the rewriting of america's restrictive immigration laws, drafted in the 1920s. he fought hard for the immigration and nationality act of 1965, signed by president lyndon johnson. and as america inches toward majority-minority status, with the descendants of european immigrants a declining share of the population, the face of today's america is the one kennedy's efforts helped create, for better... >> i think it is fair to say that senator kennedy was one of the architects of the america of the future. >> suarez: ... or for worse. >> the '65 act put american immigration on auto-pilot. >> suarez: by the time of the john kennedy administration, america had absorbed the huge ellis island generations of immigrants who poured in from europe from roughly 1880 to 1920. president kennedy, whose great- grandparents came to boston from ireland, supported scrapping the existing quota system that used 19th-century america's ethnic makeup as a template for letting in new arrivals, favoring europeans and effectively sealing off newcomers from the rest of the world. on the senate floor in 200
says president obama is trying to change america, but maybe not the change you bargained for. outspoken conservative actor jon voight will be here to tell us why he's become so involved and he'll give us his take on health care reform. and they're one of the top christian music bands in the world, but recording platinum albums and selling out concerts not their only job. they're also youth counselors who try to keep teenagers on the right path. grammy award winning casting crowns purchase one of their biggest hits here on the show tonight. well, this weekend, funeral services were held for senator ted kennedy and with his burial, the end of a long and storied senate career. though there were many controversy over the issues in his personnel life, he was true to his personnal political convictions, he didn't try to reinvent himself with each owe lex or poll and proudly proclaimed himself a liberal when most ran from the label. i respect people who are honest in their own political leanings far more than those who change with the season. no one can accuse ted kennedy of campaigning differ
, or an awakening for small business in america, because it is being crushed and the government has blood all over its hands. the obama administration and both parties in congress are forcing socialized medicine right down our throats. they are frorsing unions to take over successful businesses, and the hijacking of contracts of workers under the interestingly worded employee free choice act. they're raising your capital gains taxes, and when that frightening cap and trade passes, energy prices are going to skyrocket, not just in your home, you but also at te small business. how are they going to be able to afford to pay their utility bills? small businesses are some of the fastest growing ones out. there joining me is a man who knows all about the threats they are phrasing. his name is patrick burn, c.e.o. of one of of the moment successful retailers out there, overstock.com. also in the studio audience, we have a few other people. we have james murphy and lindsay pyren, president and vice presidents of a small business in ohio called e.s.t. an an lit analytical that smalls environmental instrume
and america'sha amased to have m back at this tle. welce. >> sorry you had to bring e. >> i joy hearing the stories out the ball gi la time here. (laughter) >> rose: w are you differt today? >> you kw, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i dn't know in 1995. > rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, sang just relax. you know, ihought 1995 en we conservatives took over coness, we owned the world. that w could pass atever we wanteto pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go tohe white house, be signednd it would be l. and what i found out was james mason was a pret smart guy. we darted further right than amica was ready to go. and you ha moderat republicans and democts in the senate. it sort ofhiseled off the edges of tt agenda. the same thing's happening now. and docrats have goneoo far left. thespent too much money. they're movi faster th the middlef american political thought is ready to go. and there learning th same lesson. >>ose: are they doing that because it is their ideaologic place or are they doi that beca
? these aren't any first editions are they? >> no. these are books that mr. and mrs. america and all the ships at sea could call for any of the reading rooms in the library of congress. these are all books in the library's general collections. the first editions will be in the rare book room. >> if somebody doesn't know about darwin and they want to start? >> well, they might want to begin with one of the magazine articles that has recently -- his birthday has spawned, nature, scientific americans, science. and you can see here we have books for the younger reader because a lot of younger readers are collectors as darwin was. and here are the rest of darwin's complete works. but there are a number of good biographies of darwin and one of the best is janet brown, who's at cornell. her two-volume work of charles darwin voyaging and charles darwin the power of place. >> how did you get interested in this? >> my first job was in trinidad with william bee bee who was the first man to go down under the ocean in a bathosphere and he was a collector and he loved a.a. mill and charles darwin. and so wh
by fox news channel] david: the fix for america's money fix is cutting welfare spending. that's a forbes flip side sure to get you fired up. hi, everybody. i'm david asman. welcome to "forbes on fox." california is slashing welfare to save money. and, jack, you say all of america should do the same? >> absolutely. california is going to emerge from this budget crisis stronger in a couple of years' time because they've been forced to make hard decisions. one of those is cutting welfare. its welfare budge set $10 billion for 2010. they're going to have to trim that to become solvent. we can all take an example of that. yes, you need some short-term solution for unemployment benefits when people lose their jobs. but after that, encourage them to get back at work. at least have contingency that encourage looking for a job. david: so we should follow you in california? >> this is not born out by the fact. california kicked the can down the street. they borrowed from municipalities, cut $15 billion from education. at the last minute headlines by cutting against welfare. but what did he cut? he
america less safe? >> jaycee dugard was found alive -- excuse me -- wasç found lyig in antioch.c@ laura: every parent's nightmare, a kidnapped child. caution,çç you are about to er the no spin zone. ççhi, everyone. i am laura ingraham, reporting tonight for bill o'reilly. now, right to our top story tonight. is the mainstream mediaç trying to use violent it's a critic? some say that is the motivation for -- is the mainstream media trying to silence a critic? >>ç how can theç obama plan cr 50 million patients without any new doctors? it cannot. it will hurt our seniors and medicare as we know it, ration care, ça limited life-çsaving madison -- ration care, limit edicine. laura: abc says that the spot departed and position on a controversial issue,çç which violates its longstanding policy -- says the spot takes a position on controversial issues which violates its longstanding policy. ççalso, some straight talk frm democrats, admitting it is too tough to take on some special interests in the health-care bill, like the trial lawyers. here is what dr/çç howard d
future. i wanted this stopped. i don't want it 10 years from now. >> this is about america, remember that. >> i don't have insurance but i don't want health care either. >> yes, we will. >> no, you won't. >> talk to us that don't have health care. >> this is taking away our freedom of choice. the people said that we could have freedom of choice, where is our choice in this? >> a lot of passion although here we saw something that we have not seen before and that is a strong showing from the acorn folks. we have heard about conservative groups trying to get together to organize. our cameras got here after apparently witnesses tell me that acorn sent two busloads of people. one picture in lenticular, this was shown to me from a person who is a local person. -- one picture in particular. there is nothing illegal about that except that it upset the local population. this is a strongly conservative county, they showed up to voice their opinions and ask questions and they felt that they were disenfranchised and they were not able to get their opportunity to comment. they said that the union folk
best hope storing conservatism a america promise. am pleased to have him back at th table. lcome. >> sry you had to bring m >> i eny hearing the stories abt the ball girl lastime here. (laughter) >> rose: hoare you differentoday? >> you kno ihink -- i think i know now in 2009 what i did't know in 1995. >rose: i hope so. >> and ironically,'m counselling my liberal democratic friends, sayi just relax. you know, i tought 1995 wh we conservatives took over congrs, we owned the world. that we could pass whever we wanted pass through the house. he senate would confirm it. it would go to t white ouse, be signed ad it would be law and what iound out was james madion was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than amera was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democra in the senate. it sort of cseled off the edges of tha agenda. the same thing'sappening now. and demrats have gone t far left. they ent too much money. they're movingaster than the middle omerican litical thought is ready to go. and they' learning the same lesson. >> re: are they doing that because it is th
that should horrify america and the connection to statements that other people and white house and what it new orleans your health care in the future particularly if you are elderly, handicapped or have very young child. if you believe this country is great the government health care is taking us in a direction we promised ourselves we never go down again. stand up, come, follow me. >> glenn: hello, america. tonight i ask you to stay with the program. this is not a sound by the program but it will taken out of context and it will be used fearmongering. what i call this is question with boldness. questions that need answers. we must have answers. i am only following the directions of the president of the united states. he told us how to find out what he really believes in. that is exactly what we're going to do in in a couple of minutes we'll talk about the views of obama's soldiers and why it's important to look -- obama's czars but first i wanted to start some places and show you the beginning of and the history of eugenics which means basically creating a master race by discouraging reproduc
the campaign i was much maligned because we said that we should give everyone in america a $5,000 tax credit so they can go any place in america. if you live in new york and you think there's an insurance policy in arizona that's better, you're not allowed to do that? why in the world is that? and as you know, there's great disparities between the cost of health insurance, varying from one state to another. back on malpractice a second. california has enacted some real improvements, texas has enacted some real improvement. we need national change to medical malpractice. let me mention -- [ applause ] i'm not going to get into too many more details, but you know one of the great increases of costs that we have today? the readmissions to hospitals. everybody here knows someone who went into the hospital, was discharged too early and had to go back to the hospital again and the costs have dramatically increased. the problem there, my friend, is the insurance companies who know they won't pay for more than a few days. that needs to be changed as well. as you know. so i have mentioned about the risk
-- to boost relations between america and of those countries. >> our team coverage continues with kate live in the studio. >> maryland officials highlight senator kennedy's accomplishments, the work he did, and the way he did it. >> i present to this convention, senator edward kennedy. >> she cochaired his 1980 presidential campaign and introduced into the crowd at the national convention. in a conversation on wednesday, she shared memories of her colleague and friend. >> ted kennedy had the courage of his conviction. he had such a great gift of working across party lines. it being willing to compromise without compromising his ideals. that is what he would want us to do now. >> across maryland, leaders pause honor his legacy. >> [unintelligible] >> from the moment of silence at the city hall to the courts in annapolis. >> my condolences go out to the kennedy family, the shriver family, and the towns and family -- townshend family. >> he said, i saw firsthand his dedication to build a society for america. it will be deeply missed. many officials called kennedy a hero and a mentor, including
foundation dedicated to promotg fiscal responsibility and aressing key enomic challeng facing america's future. >> good evening. i'martin savidge. already under fire even fore they made it official yestday anallowed a convicted terrorist to fly home to lya to die. e outrage only deepened toda after these pictures of byans lebrating abdel baset al mrahi's release were broadcast around the world al meghi, of course, was convicted for the 1988 bbing of p am 103 over lockerbie scotland. the teor attack killed 270 people. and today, once again, my peopleere demanding to know just why hade been set free. this matter of justi is once agn our "lead focus" tonight. >> reporr: abdel baset al megrahi should not be welcomed ba to tripoli, that s the message, the warni to libya om president obama in america. the demand responsible for the deaths of 270people, the biggest terrorist atck in britain was treated more lik a celebry or royalty changed into a dark suit, he was met off of thelane and then repeatedly gged by colonel gadhafis o son in fr of jubilant crowd. this morning the foreign secretary
. the all new chevy traverse. america's best crossover. so? mmmm ok. you were right. these healthy choice fresh mixer thingys, they taste fresh... say it again! what? say it like, "mmmm, these healthy choice fresh mixers taste freshh!!" they taste fresh... wait. what are you doing? got it. you're secretly taping me? you were good too! but you know, it wasn't a secret to us, we knew... yes, but it was a secret to me. of course, otherwise i would be sitting like this and completely block his shot. so that's why i was like... didn't you notice this was weird? no. they taste fresh because you make them fresh. healthy choice fresh mixers. in the soup or pasta aisle. you hungry? yeah. me too. (door crashes in) (broadview alarm) (gasp and scream) go! go! go! go! go! go! (phone rings) hello? this is mark with broadview security. is everything okay? no. someone just tried to break in. i'm sending help right now. thank you. (announcer) brink's home security is now broadview security. call now to install the standard system for just $99. the proven technology of a broadview security system delivers
are proud and happy that bank of america actually has a solution to help them out with their cards. i listen. that's the first thing i do is listen. you know what, what happened? what put you in this situation? and everyone's situation is different. we always want to make sure that we're doing what's best for our cardholders. i'll go through some of his monthly expenses, if he has a mortgage payment, if he pays rent. and then i'll use all that information to try and see what kind of a payment he financially can handle. i want to help you. bank of america wants to help you through this difficult time. when they come to you and they say thank you, aj, for helping me with this problem, that's where we get our joy from. that's what motivates us everyday. >>> the safe return of journalists euna lee and laura ling, former vice president gore this morning said laura's mother had some soup waiting for her. like any family meal, it's the family part that counts the most. for laura, it's her mother, father, husband, and sister, fellow journalist, lisa ling. >> proud would be an understatement. the lit
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
down this road is extraordinary. >> america's allies sound a health care warming. -- warning. a prom meant republican raises eyebrows in yea. an ann coulter on our american panel. we've seen a lot of outrageous behavior from politicians at town halls this week. but this morning, texas representative sheila jackson lee took the disrespect to a new level, making a cell phone call while a cancer survivor asked a question. in this video, you can sele raising the phone to her ear and lowering it back down again. i think blatant disregard like that is a first, it didn't go unnoticed. take a look at how people in the audience reacted, this video has been circulating on youtube all day. >> [beep] >> seriously. really? come on. >> it's ok. >> if our conscience allow, congress' conscience allows them to -- do you think that -- sean: the congresswoman said she merely dialed president obama's health care hotline to get an answer for her constituents that sounds like she came really prepared. joining me to discuss all of this is author of "the culture of corruption" are which remains number one o
. one is how to recognize failure, two is the evolution of god. first, jim collins, one of america's best-selling authors on business and leadership and recognizing failure. >> you would think-- at least i would have thought-- that the way great enterprises fall is they back lazy. they just become sort of fat and corps lent and they never really want to do anything new or innovative anymore. and sure enough, if you do become lazy and complacent and don't do anything new anymore you will fall. that doesn't really show how the mighty fall. it's undisciplined pursuit of more. it's overreaching. it's going too far. it's doing too much. it's undiscipline big thecht. >> rose: second, robert wright, his new book authors a new perspective ond god. >> when people look at another group of people and think they can benefit from peaceful coexistence, collaboration, cooperation or just coexistence they will usually find a basis for tolerance in their religion. >> rose: and we end with an appreciation for don hewitt, the founder of "60 minutes". he died age 86. jim collins, robert wright, and ap
to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> the quest for peace in the middle east has been going on for generations now, and it never seems to get much easier. we got that impression again today after another apparently inconclusive meeting in london between israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell. the two men and the two nations they reprent have been searching for months now for a way to resolve their differences over israeli settlements in the west bank. the u.s. has been pushing hard for an israeli settlement freeze, and the palestinians are refusing to restart peace talks until israel halts all construction there. despite their failure to reach agreement again today, the two sides will resume talks in washington next week. both men tried to put the best face on today's talks. >> we' headway in the past five months. my government has taken several steps both of word and deed to advance course of peace. and i hope that today and in the coming week
natural to start with jazz, america's indigenous art form. >> indeed, jazz is considered by many to be america's greatest artistic gift to the world. the understanding and appreciation of jazz is integral to understanding and appreciating american history and culture. >> country and classical music will also be featured in future sessions of the white house music series. >>> in case you missed it, a fourth season of "america's got talent" is under way. shows like this have brought us names including susan boyle and little caitlin mayer. the latest is the youngest and quite possibly the most precocious reality tv star we've ever seen. eun yang caught up with caitlin a year after her voice got into the competition's final rounds. >> hi. how are you going? >> i'm fine. how are you doing? >> i'm well. thank you for asking. >> she stole america's hearts with her sweet face, sparkling personality -- ♪ i think to myself what a wonderful world ♪ >> -- and her angelic voice. ♪ friends shaking hands saying how do you do they're really saying i love you ♪ >> in last season's "americ
, for america, the defender of a dream. >> ted kennedy followed his to brothers, jack and bobby into politics, and after their assassinations, he became the family patriarch and eventually a political icon. in nearly five decades in the senate, he was the voice of the liberal party wing. in the 1980 speech, it was a ted kennedy classic. >> for all of those whose careers have been our concern, the work goes on, the cause endures, the hobe still lives, and the dream john never die. -- the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. ♪ >> love him or hate him -- and there are still some ted kennedy haters out there -- washington will not be the same without him. he died at his home in massachusetts this week at the age of 77. he was diagnosed with a brain tumor in may of 2008. we knew and he knew there was no cure, only delaying action. >> the torch will be passed again to a new generation of americans. the hope rises again endangering lives on. >> despite his weakened condition, kennedy made an appearance at barack obama's convention a year ago and the inauguration in january. he spent his
and america wife. then he put the cat in a bag filled with rocks and threw it in lynch point. some say the punishment just isn't enough. >> i think there needs to be a bigger lesson here. there definitely needs to be counselling on top of more jail time. people need to know this is unacceptable. a lot of people say it is just a cat or an animal, but it is a living being. >> abel and mcdowell were released on their own recoming distance. >> and a cat cruelty case in howard county has ended with a 74-day jail sentence. that is how long he will spend behind bars after police found 74 dead cats in her columbia home in 2006. official responded to the home after neighbors complained about an odd other. four people are covering after an accident involving an ambulance in southwest baltimore. city medical number 12 collided with a small s.u.v. at the intersection of edmonton avenue and dennniso street. the two people in the s.u.v. were treated at the university of maryland medical center. >> exactly how this descend occurred has not yet been determined. we have our investigators on location to
he did lives on. for his family, he was a bargain. for america, and he was the defender of a dream. -- for his family, he was of guardian. >> we look at ted kennedy's legacy as the leading liberal in washington. welcome to "bbc world news." , broadcast you our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. >> i am mike embley in london. 70% -- 17% of the vote now counted. president karzai edges against his main rival. and one of iraq's influential leaders has died in exile in tehran. >> hello. he was the best known as american politician ever to make it -- never to make it to the white house. senator kidney -- kidnapping -- center -- senator kennedy died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. he fought for so many causes, and the tributes have flowed in from friend and foe alike. but his career was limited by self-inflicted wounds. adam brooks reports. >> the death of edward kennedy, known as ted, leads a chasm in american politics. hughes was one of the most effective politicians of the last century -- he was one of the most effective politicians of the last century. his
on "america this morning," the new addition at the san diego zoo. >> let's sayhey already know the youngster has a good set of >> let's sayhey already know the youngster has a good set of lungs. ca help save a lot m of america up to 20% cash back from over 300 online retailers with our add it up program. just sign up and use your bank of america debit or credit card when .you shop online. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. having to go in the iddle of traffic, and just starting nd stopping. having to go in the "middle of a ballgame and then not being able !to go once i got there., and going at night. i thought i had a goin problem. my doctor said i had a growing problem. it wasn't my bladder. my prostate was growing. i had an enlarging prostate that was causing my rinary symptoms., my doctor presribed avodart., (announcer) ver time, avodart actually, shrinks the prostate and improves urinary symptoms. so i can go more easil wheni need to go, and go less often. (announcer) ! avodart is for men only. due to risk of a specific birth defect. do not
and america, the iranian government blames the u.s. for fueling the protests that have engulfed the country since the controversial election of president mahmoud ahmadinejad, a cause for concern as the state department follows it closely. >> sonia gallego, thanks, sonia. >>> a top official in saddam hussein's government has been convicted of helping plan the forced removal of thousands of iraqi kurds. tariq aziz was given seven years in prison yesterday on top of a 15-year sentence he's already received for crimes against humanity. aziz served as his foreign minister and deputy prime minister. >>> in afghanistan, the taliban is claiming responsibility for a deadly bombing this morning. the remote controlled bomb went off in the western city of herat. at least ten were killed in the blast including women and children. dozens others also injured. a local police chief -- a local police chief was apparent target critically wounded. >>> in a separate attack militants killed three more u.s. troops with gunfire after attacking their convoy with a roadside bomb. that brings the death toll to six. t
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